ArchiTECHt Daily: AI expert Andrew Ng is leaving Baidu

Andrew Ng announced via Medium post last night that he is resigning from his role as head of AI at Ba
ARCHITECHT
ArchiTECHt Daily: AI expert Andrew Ng is leaving Baidu
By ARCHITECHT • Issue #43
Andrew Ng announced via Medium post last night that he is resigning from his role as head of AI at Baidu, a post he has held since 2014. He didn’t lay out specific details in his post, but in several press interviews did mention health care and education as areas in which he’s interested.
If you’re unfamiliar with Ng, it’s hard to understate his importance in the advancement of AI and machine learning, more generally, over the past few years. Baidu, of course, has made a huge investment in AI, and apart from from some widely publicized research breakthroughs (particularly in speech recognition), the company has implemented deep learning quite widely across its production services. It has at least prototyped many interesting “smart” devices, ranging from wearable to a bike.
Before Baidu, Ng helped create the Google Brain team, was a researcher and professor at Stanford, and co-founded Coursera, where he taught an immensely popular course on machine learning. 
I’ve had a chance to speak with Ng several times over the past few years—when I was at Gigaom, Fortune and even since starting ArchiTECHt—and I’ve always found him to be remarkably sincere, thoughtful and forward-thinking about AI. Not just about the next big deep learning techniques, but also about how AI will (and won’t) affect society and business. I hope he does do something in the fields of health care or education, and/or in helping to mitigate the effects of AI on the labor force, because I’m confident he can make a big difference.
You can check out my post on ArchiTECHt about the news here, but, to be honest, you can get a lot more information on Ng’s and Baidu’s future plans from these other stories at Bloomberg, VentureBeat and MIT Technology Review.
And if you haven’t listened to my recent ArchiTECHt Show podcast interview with Ng, you can do that here.

Sponsor: Datos IO
Around the web: Artificial intelligence
Well, not Intel’s recent spending spree on AI-chip startups doesn’t seem so crazy. ARM has a big existing advantage in smartphones and embedded systems to exploit with this new architecture.
Probably yes, it seems. But it also almost doesn’t matter because network effects and sunk costs/investments still matter, and GPUs own those advantages right now.
Another computer-vision-for-cars startup, this one with some high-profile investors.
Cool research from OpenAI on making robots more useful, by making them learn faster and tackle more types of tasks.
arxiv.org  •  Share
Sponsor: Marshal.io
Around the web: Cloud and infrastructure
Sure, it will start with sending your videos across the ocean, but Facebook’s infrastructure work has had outsized impacts. A better internet is a better internet, something WIRED explains in this post on the same news.
Speaking of Facebook, this is a really interesting look on how it monitors and visualizes the lifecycle of its hardware, both on individual servers and across its data centers.
Avere is helping companies manage data in their data centers as well as the public cloud, and, notably, Google was the lead investor in this round. For more on what’s hot in storage, check out the latest a16z podcast on “the storage renaissance.”
Oregon will soon be nothing but breweries, data centers and charcuterie. Seriously, though, expanding capacity outside of Virginia (home of most AWS outages) is a good idea. 
Porting over an entire existing infrastructure system seems complex and a little backward. Ideally, the consistency would come from IBM’s cloud software, right?
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